REHABILITATION
REHABILITATION

REHABILITATION BACK TO ACTIVITY

The purpose of rehabilitation is to help the injured part of the musculoskeletal system (i.e. bone, tendon, ligament, cartilage or muscle) recover in a controlled and supervised manner.
We help you through your rehabilitation process to restore function to your musculoskeletal system post a sporting injury or orthopaedic surgery, back to health, activity, sport or athletic performance.

Every injury is different and every person heals differently and their response to rehabilitation can also vary. Individual physiological, chemical and environmental differences profoundly affects the clients response to an injury/surgery or even treatment.

Therapeutic interventions play a small but important role in the rehabilitation of injuries or post surgery. They are used to create an optimal environment for the injury or surgical repair to heal, limiting inflammation and breaking the pain-cycle. They can help to decrease pain and swelling to allow for an exercise based rehabilitation programme to proceed. By understanding the physiology of healing and the influences treatment has on healing means a safe and appropriate treatment choice can be made.

In any rehabilitation journey, we manage not only the injury, but also the rest of your musculoskeletal system, ensuring it stays finely tuned. Keeping the cardiovascular system working, in addition to range of motion (joint mobility) , strength, coordination and muscle endurance of the uninjured limbs and joints. The whole body must be the focus of a rehabilitation programme and not just the injured area.

A rehabilitation exercise programme must follow a sequence of events, which is very much dependant on the various stages of healing. Thus, rehabilitation can be divided into:

  • Initial stage of healing and rehab
  • Intermediate stage
  • Advanced stage
  • Return to activity and sport
BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

This stage of rehabilitation post acute injury or post orthopaedic surgery is the acute inflammatory stage, where the damaged tissue is filled with inflammatory cells and a cascade of chemical reactions take place to allow for collagen scar formation.

Any sporting injury or surgery at this initial stage of rehabilitation can result in a loss of joint range of motion (joint mobility) due to pain, swelling (inflammatory phase), muscle spasm or muscle guarding. Not only does this cause muscle atrophy and weakness around the injured area by ‘switching muscles off and inhibiting their activation’ , but this can also have an affect on the joints above and below as they compensate, creating issues with patterns of movements.

Restoring joint range of motion and motor control by some isometric exercises is vital in the initial stages of rehab.
Addressing the muscle weakness and atrophy is another important component of rehabilitation. We use the latest technology is sport medicine to help us activate and ‘switch on’ atrophied muscles. The sooner we can commence the exercise part of rehabilitation, the sooner we can strengthen the weakened ‘switched off’ area and the sooner you can return to full activity and sport.

Rest in the initial stages of rehabilitation is also important to allow for recovery and for the damaged tissue to be replaced by the new tissue, the resilience of this new tissue is weak. Monitoring your treatment and your exercise programme is paramount as too much rest on the other hand can be detrimental to your rehabilitation.

Within this stage of rehabilitation the new repaired tissue gains some resilience by the new cross linkages of scar/collagen fibre formation so mobility, flexibility and isotonic exercises become paramount to stress the healing tissue. This allows for a healthy repair and it then becomes easier to perform activities of daily living without too much pain.

We work with you to ensure the intensity and level of exercise is administered to you at the appropriate stage of healing and soft tissue repair, with the appropriate rest advised as necessary. Knowing when to increase the exercise intensity without irritating the injury/surgery requires close observation and monitoring. Pool rehabilitation becomes a very useful adjunct of introducing movement in a safe environment without the affects of gravity adversely loading the immature newly repaired tissue.

This final stage of rehabilitation is when the new laid down repaired tissue is beginning to remodel and strengthen allowing you to return to your activities and sport related movements.
Neuromuscular control, proprioception and balance exercises, are another important component to the rehabilitation process and must be progressed at this stage of healing.

Any injury or any surgery to your soft tissue (i.e. ligaments, tendons, joints, cartilage and muscles) or even a period of immobilisation will have a profound effect on the nerve impulses originating from these structures, through the central nervous system to your brain. This important ‘signalling’ system helps provide your brain with information about the position of your joints, the direction and pressure of your movements. A rehabilitation programme must incorporate exercises to target this system to improve motor control, coordination, balance and agility. This also gives you the capacity to perform movements in a smooth, precise and controlled manner. These exercises often involve full body movements.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

REHABILITATION BACK TO ACTIVITY

The purpose of rehabilitation is to help the injured part of the musculoskeletal system (i.e. bone, tendon, ligament, cartilage or muscle) recover in a controlled and supervised manner.
We help you through your rehabilitation process to restore function to your musculoskeletal system post a sporting injury or orthopaedic surgery, back to health, activity, sport or athletic performance.

Every injury is different and every person heals differently and their response to rehabilitation can also vary. Individual physiological, chemical and environmental differences profoundly affects the clients response to an injury/surgery or even treatment.

Therapeutic interventions play a small but important role in the rehabilitation of injuries or post surgery. They are used to create an optimal environment for the injury or surgical repair to heal, limiting inflammation and breaking the pain-cycle. They can help to decrease pain and swelling to allow for an exercise based rehabilitation programme to proceed. By understanding the physiology of healing and the influences treatment has on healing means a safe and appropriate treatment choice can be made.

In any rehabilitation journey, we manage not only the injury, but also the rest of your musculoskeletal system, ensuring it stays finely tuned. Keeping the cardiovascular system working, in addition to range of motion (joint mobility) , strength, coordination and muscle endurance of the uninjured limbs and joints. The whole body must be the focus of a rehabilitation programme and not just the injured area.

A rehabilitation exercise programme must follow a sequence of events, which is very much dependant on the various stages of healing. Thus, rehabilitation can be divided into:

  • Initial stage of healing and rehab
  • Intermediate stage
  • Advanced stage
  • Return to activity and sport
BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

This stage of rehabilitation post acute injury or post orthopaedic surgery is the acute inflammatory stage, where the damaged tissue is filled with inflammatory cells and a cascade of chemical reactions take place to allow for collagen scar formation.

Any sporting injury or surgery at this initial stage of rehabilitation can result in a loss of joint range of motion (joint mobility) due to pain, swelling (inflammatory phase), muscle spasm or muscle guarding. Not only does this cause muscle atrophy and weakness around the injured area by ‘switching muscles off and inhibiting their activation’ , but this can also have an affect on the joints above and below as they compensate, creating issues with patterns of movements.

Restoring joint range of motion and motor control by some isometric exercises is vital in the initial stages of rehab.
Addressing the muscle weakness and atrophy is another important component of rehabilitation. We use the latest technology is sport medicine to help us activate and ‘switch on’ atrophied muscles. The sooner we can commence the exercise part of rehabilitation, the sooner we can strengthen the weakened ‘switched off’ area and the sooner you can return to full activity and sport.

Rest in the initial stages of rehabilitation is also important to allow for recovery and for the damaged tissue to be replaced by the new tissue, the resilience of this new tissue is weak. Monitoring your treatment and your exercise programme is paramount as too much rest on the other hand can be detrimental to your rehabilitation.

Within this stage of rehabilitation the new repaired tissue gains some resilience by the new cross linkages of scar/collagen fibre formation so mobility, flexibility and isotonic exercises become paramount to stress the healing tissue. This allows for a healthy repair and it then becomes easier to perform activities of daily living without too much pain.

We work with you to ensure the intensity and level of exercise is administered to you at the appropriate stage of healing and soft tissue repair, with the appropriate rest advised as necessary. Knowing when to increase the exercise intensity without irritating the injury/surgery requires close observation and monitoring. Pool rehabilitation becomes a very useful adjunct of introducing movement in a safe environment without the affects of gravity adversely loading the immature newly repaired tissue.

This final stage of rehabilitation is when the new laid down repaired tissue is beginning to remodel and strengthen allowing you to return to your activities and sport related movements.
Neuromuscular control, proprioception and balance exercises, are another important component to the rehabilitation process and must be progressed at this stage of healing.

Any injury or any surgery to your soft tissue (i.e. ligaments, tendons, joints, cartilage and muscles) or even a period of immobilisation will have a profound effect on the nerve impulses originating from these structures, through the central nervous system to your brain. This important ‘signalling’ system helps provide your brain with information about the position of your joints, the direction and pressure of your movements. A rehabilitation programme must incorporate exercises to target this system to improve motor control, coordination, balance and agility. This also gives you the capacity to perform movements in a smooth, precise and controlled manner. These exercises often involve full body movements.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

STRENGTH / RESISTANCE TRAINING

Strength training by definition is a type of physical exercise using resistance, either body weight (gravity) resistance bands or weight machines to stimulate the muscle to contract which builds the strength and the size of the skeletal muscle.

Compelling medical evidence has proven in research that resistance training is an effective tool for the prevention and the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. Evidence also suggests that regular participation in resistance training throughout adulthood can minimise age-related musculoskeletal alterations and reduce the impact on health and the ageing process.

We lose strength from our dynamic muscular system not only after an injury or after orthopaedic surgery, but unfortunately also due to the ageing process. Research has confirmed that we lose on average 3-8% of muscle mass every decade, essentially 1% per year after the age of 40. So the good old fashion saying: “If you don’t use it, you lose it”-couldn’t be more true!

Age is linked with muscle atrophy and functional impairments which is not altered by cardiovascular exercise as in running, cycling or swimming. But is partially reversed at DNA level by resistance training.

Inactivity also leads to muscle atrophy, loss of aerobic capacity and fatiguability. Operations no matter how minor lead to muscle weakness and atrophy. Unless steps are taken to ‘activate’ and ‘switch them back on’ by stimulating them to work again.

Our exercise programmes

We work with you to formulate an exercise programme that will target your area of weakness through a programme of resistance training that will optimise muscle recruitment and motor control that is consistent with the nature function of the muscle at the appropriate stage of healing.

There are four components of muscle conditioning that is necessary in the rehabilitation post injury or orthopaedic surgery:

  • Muscle activation and motor control re-education
  • Muscle strength
  • Muscle power
  • Muscle endurance

Each of the above components being essential at varying degrees within activities of daily living, sport or athletic performance.

The exercises used in muscle strength training are;

  • Isometric exercises which are exercises that improves strength with movement performed at an intensity low enough that the newly formed repaired tissue in the initial stages of healing and rehabilitation are not disrupted.
  • Isotonic exercises are performed when the joint moves though a range of motion against a constant resistance or weights. These exercises help provide the stress necessary for the soft tissue to form the cross linkages of collagen material in the intermediate stage of healing.
  • Isokinetic exercises can be an important aspect of strengthening but uses equipment that provides resistance to movement at a set speed and generally tends to be used within the athletic population for testing and rehabilitation.
BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

POOL REHABILITATION

Is a form of rehabilitation that can complement and used in conjunction with other forms of rehabilitation. It can be used in acute or chronic injury or post surgical repair once the wounds have adequately healed. It allows for early movement without the effects of gravity and you don’t need to know how to swim to perform the rehab exercises in the pool.

Profound physiological changes take place during immersion into the pool and research over the last fifteen years has been dedicated towards defining and understanding these changes in human physiology.

Pool rehabilitation has many physiological benefits as defined by recent research and is used widely in professional and semi-professional sport. Some of the physiological benefits are:

  • Pain relief and reduced muscle spasm due to the warmth of the water, the reduced effects of gravity and the suppression of the sympathetic nervous system.
  • Reduces swelling and improves circulation
  • Improves joint range of movement, flexibility and allows for early mobilisation
  • Improves strength and endurance by using the viscosity, buoyancy, turbulence, weight and density of the water to apply resistance your exercises
  • Helps in the re-education of functional activities and neuromuscular control in the gait cycle, which can be progressed in the sporting client to jogging, running, sprint drills and even the introduction of plyometric training.
  • Improves cardiovascular fitness by the hydrostatic pressure applied onto the body on immersion leading to increased cardiac output and stroke volume. In athletic performance, this creates the perfect environment for cardiovascular training to simulate running and sprinting without the adverse affects of body weight loading.

All the above factors significantly help with the speed of your return to activity, training or athletic performance and sport.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

POOL REHABILITATION

Is a form of rehabilitation that can complement and used in conjunction with other forms of rehabilitation. It can be used in acute or chronic injury or post surgical repair once the wounds have adequately healed. It allows for early movement without the effects of gravity and you don’t need to know how to swim to perform the rehab exercises in the pool.

Profound physiological changes take place during immersion into the pool and research over the last fifteen years has been dedicated towards defining and understanding these changes in human physiology.

Pool rehabilitation has many physiological benefits as defined by recent research and is used widely in professional and semi-professional sport. Some of the physiological benefits are:

  • Pain relief and reduced muscle spasm due to the warmth of the water, the reduced effects of gravity and the suppression of the sympathetic nervous system.
  • Reduces swelling and improves circulation
  • Improves joint range of movement, flexibility and allows for early mobilisation
  • Improves strength and endurance by using the viscosity, buoyancy, turbulence, weight and density of the water to apply resistance your exercises
  • Helps in the re-education of functional activities and neuromuscular control in the gait cycle, which can be progressed in the sporting client to jogging, running, sprint drills and even the introduction of plyometric training.
  • Improves cardiovascular fitness by the hydrostatic pressure applied onto the body on immersion leading to increased cardiac output and stroke volume. In athletic performance, this creates the perfect environment for cardiovascular training to simulate running and sprinting without the adverse affects of body weight loading.

All the above factors significantly help with the speed of your return to activity, training or athletic performance and sport.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

SPORT REHABILITATION

For any sport competitors being amateur or professional, commencing a rehabilitation programme in a safe and pain-free environment as soon as possible without aggravating the injury/surgery is key for an early return to your sport.

The maintenance of muscular and cardiovascular function is also vital for the none injured areas of your body. Impairments and functional losses are minimised by an early intervention of a rehabilitation programme addressing joint mobility, strength, neuromuscular control, motor patterning, proprioception and strength endurance. Commencing with simple exercises, performed slowly and perfectly executed, gradually increasing in speed and complexity.

The rehabilitation journey must also respect and reproduce the activities and movement patterns required for that sport. A rehabilitation programme following injury to a football player would be designed very different to a programme for a rugby player. Preparing for any competition requires the restoration of strength, power, agility, speed and endurance at the levels exhibited in that particular sport.

We work with you throughout your rehabilitation journey with motor re-learning, refining, and developing skill acquisition necessary for your sport. Helping you return to function and peak performance. We will communicate with your coach or consultant with a report on your rehabilitation progress if you wish.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

START YOUR JOURNEY TO RECOVERY TODAY

BOOK AN APPOINTMENTOR CALL 01670 620 200

START YOUR JOURNEY TO RECOVERY TODAY

BOOK AN APPOINTMENTOR CALL 01670 620 200

START YOUR JOURNEY TO RECOVERY TODAY

BOOK AN APPOINTMENTOR CALL 01670 620 200